All posts filed under: Kindness

Public Fridge for the Homeless

How many times have you left a restaurant with a to-go box, only to toss it in the trash a few days later? In Kochi, India, you can share your leftovers with the homeless population by leaving it in an outdoor fridge! Minu Pauline, restaurant owner of Pappadavada, came up with this solution to help the less fortunate folks in her city: She covers the cost of the fridge and electricity while she, along with the community, do their part to donate excess food that they are going to throw out anyway. I just love this. When I first arrived in the United States, one of the first things I noticed were the large portions, so there is always an abundance of wasted food. I know some companies are already donating their unsold goods to food banks, but, as Minu shows, you don’t have to be a giant corporation to make a difference in people’s lives. What an inspiration!   Source: BetterIndia.com

A Little Help with a Tie

When an elderly lady noticed a young man struggling to tie his tie in a subway, she asked her husband to help and teach him. Her husband then taught him how, step by step, and even asked the young man to demo it back to show that he can now do it himself. It’s a simple story from last year that stuck with me. Perhaps it’s the photo of these two generations interacting or it’s the simple act of taking the time to help a random stranger that resonates with me. Either way, I had to share today. :) Source: Redd Thomas, Facebook

A Sign of Hope

This is one of my favorite videos from last year. It shows a whole town in Turkey learning sign language so they can surprise Muharrem, their deaf neighbor. Seeing his face light up when he slowly realized that he was able to communicate with everyone that morning, makes me smile so much. Though this video was created as part of a company’s promotion, it does not take away from the fact that the neighborhood took the time to participate and learn for this event. To me, this is also a sign of hope: Hope for raised awareness of the barriers many people have to overcome in order to live “normally.” Hope for more technology that can bring us closer as a human race. And finally, hope for people to realize the tremendous impact that a simple kind gesture can bring to a person’s life.  

Christopher Ategeka: From Orphan to Entrepreneur

“Life got really good,” Ategeka laughed. “They bought me a bicycle and gave me three meals a day, which is a luxury, by the way.” Talk about perspective. It’s a bit of a challenge to summarize Christopher Ategeka’s amazing life story in a few words, but I honestly feel that I have to share this with everyone I know right now. Christopher is an orphan in Uganda who lost his mother and father to AIDS at the age of seven. With his love of learning burning in him, he attempted to go to school through a charity and was denied due to lack of funds. When he was 12 however, an American couple, Michael and Martha Helm, offered to sponsor him through a church-based NGO and orphanage Y.E.S. Uganda. His drive and discipline impressed the couple, who continued to offer him the chance to live with them in California so he can continue his education. But the story does not end there. Christopher then proceeded to graduate with a masters degree in UC Berkeley and has since founded a non-profit organization, Rides for Lives. His group’s …

A Dress a Day: A 99-Year-Old Woman’s Mission

  Although I’m not at retirement age yet, I sometimes wonder what I would do when I am not able to work anymore. How would the days look like to begin with? If I’m blessed with good health enough to live up to my 90s and jetpacks aren’t around yet, would I read books? Continue blogging? Spoil my grandchildren? Do old-people dances with my husband to “pop classics” such as Katy Perry (jk!)? Maybe all of the above. What didn’t cross my mind immediately is what Lillian Webber is doing now: She is making a dress each day for a child in Africa. In the past two years, Lillian has made more than 840 dresses for less fortunate kids — she even personalizes each one so that the recipient can call it her own. The frocks are sent overseas through the nonprofit organization, Little Dresses for Africa, who then delivers these pretty blessings to orphanages, schools, and churches. Lillian’s goal is to make 1000 dresses by May 6th, which will be her 100th birthday. What will she do after that thousandth dress? “When I get to that …

Smiling Kids in Cape Town

This video is bursting with excitement and smiles, you’d think the kids won a trip to Disneyland…  but the children are orphans from Cape Town, South Africa and they are simply excited. To say that they do not have much is an understatement, yet they really are just THAT happy  to see a friend/volunteer whom they’ve missed in the past six months. Captured from a first person’s point of view via GoPro, it is hard not to smile back at the lovely faces.   Read about Intsikelelo’s story. Really impressive, you guys. I am so inspired by your kindness, motivation, optimism, and heart.

Caffe Sospeso: The Best Cup of Coffee

  Caffe Sospeso (“Suspended Coffee”) is a tradition in Italy that involves a customer buying a cup of coffee for someone who cannot afford it, as an anonymous act of charity. This started when cafe patrons in the working-class parts of Naples who experienced good luck would buy two cups of coffee and consume only one. The cafe would then reserve the other cup for a less fortunate person, and serve it to him/her for free. I thought that this story is an internet hoax because it just sounded too nice to be true. As it turns out, snopes (urban legend debunker site) confirmed it based on several personal accounts, and I’d like to believe it is. This is one way to spread good karma around — although simple, it shows people sharing their joy and caring for their fellowmen, strangers included. Thank you for the idea, Naples!